Feed on
Posts
Comments

Category Archive for 'Plant Evolution'

Looking Out For Number One In a previous post, way back last December, regarding the notion of plant “pain”, I acknowledged the subject of “damaged-self recognition” in plants, but I didn’t want to elaborate on it at that time. Well, it looks like now’s the time…. “Damaged-self recognition” in plants has to do with how […]

Read Full Post »

From How Sunflowers Track The Sun To Where Strawberries Came From The eighth month of the year may be when many people are on holiday (at least in the Northern Hemisphere). But plant science news didn’t take a holiday. Indeed, there were so many popular reports published last August, it was difficult for me to […]

Read Full Post »

From A New Look At Lichens To A Moss Surprise July 2016 seemed to be a time to rethink several long-held presumptions about lichens and chloroplasts. A couple of plant research news reports changed the way we look at symbiotic plants and photosynthesis. “For over 140 years, lichens have been regarded as a symbiosis between […]

Read Full Post »

From Anthropocene To Eocene II? A mountainside near where I live gave way in January 2009 (as a result of torrential rains) resulting in Racehorse Creek rock slide. This landslide revealed a treasure-trove of fossils, mainly 55-million-year old fossils of plants that were alive during the Eocene. Most interestingly, perhaps, this time corresponds to to […]

Read Full Post »

Since the daffodils are out in full force here in the upper left-hand corner of the U.S., I decided to revisit this post from 2013 and revise it a bit. Hope you enjoy it (again?)…. Doesn’t the Scientific Study of Flower Development Ruin the Aesthetic Beauty of Flowers? Here’s the best answer to that question […]

Read Full Post »

The Last Roundup®?

News Roundup® This has not been a good month for the herbicide Roundup®. (You can read a brief introduction to Roundup® here.) Both the New York Times and Science magazine featured news articles about this widely-used herbicide (see References below), and the news isn’t good. Briefly, the NY Times article reports on the growing concern […]

Read Full Post »

na.ked [nay-kid] adj.- “exposed to view or plainly revealed“ Good Times For Tomato Science The tomato (a.k.a., Solanum lycopersicum). What are the chemicals that make most homegrown tomatoes taste so good? What is the genome sequence of the domesticated tomato? And how is it related to wild relatives, and even to potatoes? These interesting and […]

Read Full Post »

“Back To The Future.” A while back on this blog, I spent a bit of time exploring how some herbicides kill plants. The focus was primarily on auxin-based herbicides such as 2,4-D (one of the herbicides in the notorious Agent Orange) and glyphosate, commonly known as Roundup®. The former kills primarily broadleaf plants, and the […]

Read Full Post »

The First Flower? How did flowering plants (angiosperms) evolve from non-flowering seed plants (gymnosperms)? Or did they? When did the first flowers appear on this planet? And where on Earth did it occur? These are some of the most hotly-debated questions among botanists today, partly because some of the fossil-based data is at odds with […]

Read Full Post »

Back in 2007, when I was boring undergraduates at Montana State University, I read a brilliant book by David Beerling called The Emerald Planet: How Plants Changed Earth’s History. I was recently reminded of this book by Nigel Chaffey’s “Plant Cuttings” article in the March 2012 issue of Annals of Botany. (By the way, you […]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »